Drywall dust

Some Things you Should Never Attempt to Vacuum

I’m sure many of us can relate to the experience of vacuuming up something we didn’t intend to which caused a number of issues for our handheld vacuum cleaner, perhaps even resulting in the need to purchase a new one altogether. Often in our haste to finish the job as quickly as possible, we tend to roll over everything in our path indiscriminately. However, there are some things that you might want to avoid vacuuming whenever possible and just pick up by hand:

Loose hardware

Some Things you Should Never Attempt to Vacuum

Things such as loose screws, nails, tacks, etc. can be a nightmare when vacuumed. Not only do they make a ton of noise clanking around when vacuumed, they also can tear up any bags or debris containers your vacuum uses. These can be expensive to replace in some instances depending on the severity. Not to mention, loose nails and whatnot can damage the vacuums motor beyond repair.

Drywall dust

Drywall dust

I once bought an expensive handheld vacuum cleaner for a fraction of the price at a garage sale due to it being absolutely filled with drywall dust. This sort of project can take days to complete; drywall dust has a habit of getting clogged and stuck everywhere within the vacuum, and every nook and cranny will need to be cleaned out to return it to normal. This is one mistake many people unfortunately make.

Kitty litter

If unused, this is not the case. However, many unfortunate cat owners have found that vacuuming up soiled bits of kitty litter will lead to an awfully bad smelling vacuum over time. By this time, often changing bags and/or filters won’t even be any help. Once the smell has settled in, you can be sure that any room/area vacuumed with that particular vacuum cleaner will take on the smell as well. Take the time and find a broom and dustpan!

Perishable Foods

It may seem tempting to just vacuum up some bits of meat or fruits/vegetables that have fallen on the floor, but don’t do it! It may not even cross your mind as problematic at the time, but those pieces of food won’t look or smell anything like they did when first made when you go to empty your bag or debris container.

Wet soil:

Somewhat obvious, but don’t run your vacuum cleaner over wet soil. This can push the soil to become even matted further into the carpeting, causing a far bigger mess than you started with. Not to mention, the vacuum cleaner itself can become clogged beyond repair by the soil creeping into every little nook and cranny it’s able to find.

These simple mistakes can and are made by anyone and everyone. However, we can learn from others mistakes and save ourselves a lot of time, money and frustration that others have. Keep an eye out for what exactly you are vacuuming and think through what effect the material/debris you are about to vacuum could have on the mechanical parts of your handheld vacuum.

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *